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Testimonial

Dr. Berman, Dr. Bran,
Dr. Hawran & Dr. Eleftherion
 

"Is your child's vision getting worse every year? We can help!"

Infographic: What You Should Know If Your Child Is Nearsighted

If your child’s vision is worsening every year, you may be concerned with how bad will it become. Myopia (nearsightedness) usually begins between the ages of 8 and 18. The earlier a child’s distance vision weakens, the more likely they will have a strong prescription during their high school years and beyond. Often the most rapid changes occur during a child’s teens.

For decades, eye doctors and researchers have been studying the way the eyes change throughout a person’s lifetime and have determined that slowing down the progression of nearsightedness (controlling myopia) is possible.

Myopia Control Treatments for myopia are based on changing the corneal surface and how light focuses within the eyes. Not only will controlling myopia prevent children from requiring stronger and stronger glasses and contact lenses, it can reduce the risk of serious eye diseases later in life such as early onset of cataracts, retinal detachments, macular degeneration and even glaucoma.

Corneal Refractive Therapy (CRT) Studies have found the most effective way to slow or stop the progression of myopia is with specially designed contact lenses to change the shape of the cornea. This method is commonly referred to as corneal refractive therapy (CRT) or orthokeratology (ortho-k). By wearing these lenses overnight, the cornea is essentially remolded (similar to the concept of braces for the teeth) to reduce or eliminate the need for daytime glasses or contact lenses. While adults are also candidates for CRT if they desire to be free of vision correction during the day and are not interested in LASIK surgery, the one of the greatest benefits is the reduction or stoppage of myopia progression in children and teens.

For more information on CRT and myopia control, click here (CRT) and visit http://www.allaboutvision.com/parents/myopia.htm